Christmas Message

Dec

26

2023

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Dec

26

2023

I have been led to write a Christmas message. Renowned intellect and author C. S. Lewis sent a Christmas message a few decades back that warned of a world that no longer knew right from wrong. I can think of nothing that is more poignant this Christmas than his words. They are just as relevant today as when they were originally penned if not more so.

The wider Western world, indeed, appears to have lost a sense of right and wrong. And it addresses, with almost startling prescience, many of the same culture-war issues simmering for years in the United States and exploding across the nation after the Oct. 7 Hamas terror attacks on Israel.

Irish-born academic Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963), a fellow and tutor of Magdalen College, Oxford, 1950. (John Chillingworth/Getty Images)

“There is no objective right or wrong” among post-Christians, Lewis wrote in his Christmas Sermon. Each race or class can invent its own code or ‘ideology’ just as it pleases.” He concluded that we have indeed awakened from a nightmare.” Unfortunately, his popularity as a Christian author faded over the decades. Lewis’ Christian faith was well known in its time. One of his most ardent readers was Ronald Reagan. It is a shame that someone like him is no longer President and sadly a candidate with his Christian bedrock is not currently running and our situation is not optimistic.

Recently A headline readIVY LEAGUE SCHOOLS FOUNDED TO PROMOTE VIRTUE, GODLINESS HAVE ‘DRIFTED RADICALLY’ AND ‘FORGOTTEN THEIR ROOTS’ Its disappearance was hastened by the general secularization of society and by a politically motivated effort to remove the foundational values of Christianity from American history and western culture. Lewis examined his belief system, and that of the changing world, not just as an expression of faith but with the academic curiosity of a scholar. President Ronald Reagan biographer Craig Shirley called Lewis’ perspective the “intellectualism of Christianity.”

Ronald Wilson Reagan, 40th president of the United States, was deeply influenced by C.S. Lewis’ faith, said biographer Craig Shirley

The president, not coincidentally, built his political foundation on personal beliefs, like Lewis, that the world was divided between right and wrong, good and evil. This outlook ultimately helped topple the Soviet Union and win the Cold War for western democracies, Shirley and other scholars have noted. Lewis’ warnings about a world that rejected Christian faith and foundational values in favor of a shifting morality appeared to become an unmistakable reality this autumn following the Oct. 7 terror attacks on Israel.

Some major institutions, including those of higher learning, have appeared unable to condemn terror attacks on Israeli civilians or threats of genocide against Jews on campuses — even comprehend why such things are wrong or dangerous. The same holds true with open borders, legalized drugs, sex on demand, violence and mayhem with no punitive punishment or meaningful jail and prison time. “What he said has a lot of resonance … today, when people are wondering where the light is among all of this darkness. What he said has a lot of meaning with people with what’s going on in the world today, when people are wondering where the light is among all of this darkness.”

The Christian faith of early 20th-century Irish author C.S. Lewis is enjoying a rebirth right now as American culture, and the wider Western world, appear to have lost a sense of right and wrong. Credit the recent rediscovery of the author’s writings on religion, culture and morality, including “A Christmas Sermon for Pagans,” published in December 1946 in Strand magazine. The letter compared pagan, or what he called pre-Christian beliefs, to those that emerged during and after the global crises and warfare of the early 20th century. He called it “post-Christian” philosophy. But it addresses, with almost startling prescience, many of the same culture-war issues simmering for years in the United States and exploding across the nation after the Oct. 7 Hamas terror attacks on Israel. “There is no objective right or wrong” among post-Christians, Lewis wrote in the “Christmas Sermon.” “Each race or class can invent its own code or ‘ideology’ just as it pleases.” He added, “Now if the post-Christian view is the correct one, then we have indeed waked from a nightmare.”

Sadly, the popularity of Lewis’ religious writing faded over the decades. This is not to say that it has lost its saltiness. What he states is right on spot.

Lewis’ writings had a profound influence on President Reagan, Shirley told Fox News Digital. The president, not coincidentally, built his political foundation on personal beliefs, like Lewis, that the world was divided between right and wrong, good and evil. This outlook ultimately helped topple the Soviet Union and win the Cold War for western democracies.

The reality this fall following the Oct. 7 terror attacks on Israel. Some major institutions, including those of higher learning, have appeared unable to condemn terror attacks on Israeli civilians or threats of genocide against Jews on campuses — even comprehend why such things are wrong or dangerous.

“Today, when people are wondering where the light is among all of this darkness we know that Satan is alive and well and still waging intense war on Gods people which according to C.S. Lewis’ description of us includes Christians and pre-Christians. Therein lies the positive in my Christmas message. There is hope and it came with the birth of Jesus

Matthew 24:12
There will be more and more evil in the world, so most people will stop showing their love for each other. But those people who keep their faith until the end will be saved.

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